Monthly Archives: August 2009

FSPMI – Toshiba Dispute Resolved

The Internatioanl Metalworkers’ Federation (IMF) has announced today that the dispute between Federasi Serikat Pekerja Metal Indonesia and Toshiba has been resolved.  As a result of the resolution, nearly 700 mostly female workers who have been locked out and dismissed will be unconditionally re-instated.  The workers went on strike April 16th after the company refused to implement a collective bargaining agreement signed by both parties and fired 15 members of the local union leadership.  All 700 workers were subsequently locked-out and dismissed by the company.

Under threat of criminal charges against union leadership, a civil lawsuit against FSPMI for damages, and the potential for the company to bring in replacement contract workers, the union conceded that the 15 union leaders would agree to resign from the company rather than demand re-instatement.  As one local leader described, “The fifteen leaders have resigned from the company and they will be paid adequate compensation. Most important is that the union status in this company is restored. If we had prolonged this struggle the company could have replaced the dismissed workers with contract workers because the Labour Court granted such decision in favour of the company.”  Those same leaders will continue to work with the FSPMI to assist the newly elected local union leadership.

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Jobs For The People

From the Jakarta Post: A young boy carries a protest poster during at a rally held by the Street Parliament Alliance in front of Jakarta City Hall on Tuesday. The protestors called for the newly-elected councilor to sign a “pro-people” political contract.  Antara/Fanny Octavianus

From the Jakarta Post: A young boy carries a protest poster during at a rally held by the Street Parliament Alliance in front of Jakarta City Hall on Tuesday. The protestors called for the newly-elected councilor to sign a “pro-people” political contract. Antara/Fanny Octavianus

From A Minimum Wage To A Living Wage

From The Jakarta Post:

The minimum wages set by the government in 2009 met an average of 64 percent of the basic needs of workers employed in the textiles and garments sector, a recent survey found. The survey was jointly conducted by the National Workers Union (SPN), the Garment and Textile Workers Union Federation (Garteks) and AKATIGA, a center for social analysis supported by German-based NGO Frederich Ebert Stiftung (FES) and the Asian Textile Workers Union (TWARO), in Banten, Jakarta, West and Central Java, in March and April, 2009.

(sent out on the JoyoNews list here, can’t seem to find the link to the JP article)

Metal Workers Strike in East Java

Kompas is reporting 132 workers have gone on strike at PT Nasional Interindo Metal in Mojokerto, East Java.  The workers went on strike over pay cuts that would reduce their pay, based on per ton production, by over 7%, as well concerns over workers’ right to pray on Fridays, with workers facing fines of nearly a day’s pay if they violated company rules over prayer.  The article does not mention the name of any workers’ organization or trade union involved in the strike.

Protest Outside Malaysian Consulate in Medan

Waspada.com is reporting hundreds of workers from the PT WRP marched on the Malaysian Consulate in Medan this afternoon under the name the Anti-Oppression People’s Front (Front Rakyat Anti Penindasan – FRAP).  The protest was in regards to arbitrary and unilateral firings, a lack of pay raises, and the environmental effects of the factory on surrounding communities, with protesters urging the government and the Malaysian Consulate to intervene.

Waspada Online/Dedy Rizky Ginting

Waspada Online/Dedy Rizky Ginting

Union Perspective on Jamsostek

The Jakarta Post has this article on the shortcomings of Jamsostek, the Indonesian social security system that up until now covers a fraction of the workforce.  Here’s their quote from labor representatives:

Labor unions have lambasted the government and employers for their lack of willingness to protect workers, saying that under the 1945 Constitution and 2004 National Social Security System Law, both the government and employers have to put money into the programs to protect workers and that sanctions must be imposed on employers who violate the 1992 law.

“Many employers have registered only a part of their work force or reported only a fraction of their employees monthly salaries to reduce the amount they have to pay into the program,” said Bambang Wirahyoso, chairman of the National Workers Union (SPN).

“The Misery of Migrant Workers”: JG

Today’s The Jakarta Globe has this article on the issue of migrant workers, detailing the ways in which various government agencies pass the buck when it comes to migrant workers, along with some suggestions by advocates on how to make resources and information available to migrant workers.